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Debunking common myths related to motorcycle safety

Motorcyclists are subjected to heightened safety risks on the road, especially when coursing busy thoroughfares laden with other drivers who may be distracted, inattentive or careless. While some motorcycle safety precautions are commonalities, others are incorrectly understood.

The Huffington Post shared an article which discusses some of these myths and aims to educate bikers and drivers alike to encourage motorcycle safety. Some of these notorious myths include:

  • Loud is best: While some people believe that a loud exhaust increases a motorcyclist’s safety by making more noise, this is false. Not only do many motorists drive with their windows up and music blaring, but sound projects backward which does nothing for drivers that may be in front of a motorcyclist.
  • Leather is a fashion statement: Because many bikers sport leather chaps, jackets and other apparel, people commonly think it is a fashion statement designed to make bikers appear more hardcore. However, the truth is that leather is highly effective against preventing road rash and bodily injury in the event a biker crashes.
  • Drivers are aware: Unfortunately, not all drivers are attentive and vigilant. In fact, even the most careful drivers can sometimes miss something in their blind spot. Bikers should never assume that they are going to be seen. Rather, they should always drive attentively and be sure that motorists can see them before changing lanes, turning or making other maneuvers.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 14 percent of all traffic fatalities were people driving motorcycles. Additionally, in the same year, nearly 88,000 bikers were injured.  

 

Related Posts: Common causes of motorcycle accidents: Part 1, Does a helmet help in a motorcycle accident?, Motorcyclists killed in New York accident, Can a party partially responsible for an accident claim damages?

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