Articles Posted in Medical Malpractice

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Delays in obtaining an accurate diagnosis can have grave consequences. As such, doctors who carelessness neglect to provide their patients with a timely diagnosis should be held accountable. A plaintiff harmed by a doctor’s inattentive care can often recover damages for medical malpractice, but if the doctor was a federal employee, the plaintiff must provide adequate notice of the claim prior to filing a lawsuit. The obligations imposed on plaintiffs pursuing claims against medical professionals that are government employees were the topic of a recent opinion issued in a New York primary care malpractice case. If you suffered harm due to the negligence of your primary care physician, it is in your best interest to meet with a Syracuse medical malpractice lawyer to discuss your rights.

The Plaintiff’s Harm

It is reported that the plaintiff complained of painful urination, foul-smelling urine, and other urological symptoms to the defendant primary care physician on numerous occasions. At the time he was experiencing symptoms, the plaintiff was living in a federal facility, and the defendant physician was a federal employee. Despite his complaints, the defendant did not perform a urine culture or refer the plaintiff to a specialist. When he ultimately went to a specialist a year and a half later, he was diagnosed with Stage IV prostate cancer.

It is alleged that the cancer then spread to his spine, causing him to be paraplegic. He subsequently filed medical malpractice claims against the defendant physician and negligent hiring claims against the defendant facility, pursuant to the Federal Tort Claims Act (the Act). The defendants then moved to dismiss the plaintiff’s claims. Continue reading

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Generally, in medical malpractice cases, plaintiffs will present evidence of the harm suffered and ask the jury to issue a verdict in their favor but will not request a specific damages amount. As such, what constitutes an appropriate amount of compensation is typically within the purview of the jury. If a defendant feels that a verdict is unjust, it may move for a judgment to be modified, however. Recently, a New York court discussed what a court considers when determining whether a judgment in a medical malpractice case is excessive, in a matter in which the defendant’s negligence caused the plaintiff’s decedent’s death. If you lost a loved one because of a careless physician, it is in your best interest to speak to a Syracuse medical malpractice lawyer to assess your possible claims.

The History of the Case

It is reported that the defendant gynecologist treated the plaintiff’s decedent. During the course of her care, she complained of symptoms indicating ovarian issues, but no testing was performed. She was ultimately diagnosed with ovarian cancer after it had progressed and spread to other parts of her body. She died from the disease a short time later.

Allegedly, the plaintiff filed a lawsuit against the defendant, alleging his negligent failure to diagnose the decedent’s ovarian cancer caused her death. The case was tried in front of a jury who awarded over $3 million in damages to the plaintiff. The defendant moved to set aside the jury’s verdict as excessive, and the court denied the motion, after which the defendant appealed. Continue reading

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It is not uncommon for patients to suffer complications after surgical procedures, and in many instances, such complications are preventable and only arise due to the careless acts of one of the doctors involved in the surgery. The mere occurrence of an adverse event, however, does not necessarily indicate a doctor committed medical malpractice. This was demonstrated in a recent case in which the court rejected the plaintiff’s assertions that anesthesia errors caused his harm and ruled in favor of the defendant. If you sustained losses because of a careless anesthesiologist, it is prudent to confer with a Syracuse medical malpractice lawyer regarding your options for seeking damages.

The Plaintiff’s Harm

It is alleged that the plaintiff underwent a surgical repair of a tear of a tendon of his left elbow. The defendant administered the plaintiff anesthesia prior to the surgery. Specifically, he administered a nerve block. After the anesthesia wore off, however, the plaintiff began to feel extreme pain in his left hand, and his fingers were swollen. He was also unable to flex two of his fingers. He was subsequently diagnosed with a brachial plexus nerve injury.

Reportedly, the plaintiff filed a medical malpractice lawsuit against the defendant, alleging his negligent performance of his professional duties caused the plaintiff’s harm. During the trial, the plaintiff asked the court to instruct the jury on the doctrine of res ipsa loquitor, but the court declined. The jury ruled in favor of the defendant, and the plaintiff filed a motion to set aside the verdict as against the weight of the evidence and to argue that the court failed to instruct the jury as requested. Continue reading

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The outcome of medical malpractice cases rests squarely on how the judge and jury view the evidence presented by the parties. Thus, while a plaintiff may believe her evidence to be compelling and sufficient to obtain a verdict in her favor, the outcome of the case may indicate otherwise. While there are measures a plaintiff can take to attempt to overturn a seemingly unjust verdict, they are often unsuccessful. Recently, a New York court discussed the evaluation of evidence in a medical malpractice case in which the plaintiff filed an appeal on numerous evidentiary grounds. If you were injured by incompetent medical care, it is smart to speak to a Syracuse medical malpractice lawyer to discuss what evidence you will need to recover compensation.

The Plaintiff’s Allegations

It is reported that the plaintiff underwent laparoscopic surgery at the defendant hospital to address a ruptured ectopic pregnancy. During the surgery, she suffered nerve damage, and she subsequently filed a medical malpractice lawsuit against the defendant hospital and the surgeon who performed the procedure.

Allegedly, after discovery was complete, the plaintiff moved for summary judgment, but the court denied her motion. The case went to trial, and the jury issued a verdict in favor of the defendant. The plaintiff then filed a motion to set aside the verdict as against the weight of the evidence, but her motion was denied. She then appealed the denial of both motions. Continue reading

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Many state-owned and operated facilities house individuals on a short-term or long-term basis. It is not uncommon for people confined in such facilities to require medical care, and if their requests are denied or the care is incompetently rendered, it can cause serious harm. As such, people injured by negligent treatment offered in state facilities may have grounds to pursue medical malpractice claims. They must follow the proper procedure for pursuing such claims, though, as the failure to do so may result in a dismissal, as demonstrated in a recent ruling issued by a New York court. If you sustained losses because of the incompetence of a health care provider, it is wise to confer with a trusted Syracuse medical malpractice lawyer to discuss your avenues for seeking compensation.

The Plaintiff’s Harm

It is alleged that in June 2019, the plaintiff was being transported to a facility owned and operated by the state when he was attacked by another individual. Immediately after arriving at the facility, the plaintiff requested medical care for the injuries obtained in the assault. His request was declined, however. He subsequently filed a federal lawsuit against the state, asserting numerous claims arising out of his attack and subsequent denial of medical treatment, including medical malpractice claims.

Reportedly, the plaintiff was not represented by an attorney. The state moved to dismiss the plaintiff’s claims on the grounds they were barred by the Eleventh Amendment of the United States Constitution. After reviewing the pleadings, the court granted the defendant’s motion and dismissed the plaintiff’s claims. Continue reading

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Many people who require medical tests or procedures use insurance to pay for the services they receive. While insurance companies often conduct reviews to determine if care is necessary, they do not provide medical care. Thus, as discussed in a recent opinion issued in a New York case, they generally cannot be held liable for medical malpractice. If you suffered harm due to negligently rendered medical care, it is in your best interest to consult a Syracuse medical malpractice lawyer about your potential claims.

The Plaintiff’s Harm

Allegedly, the plaintiff visited her doctor in November 2018 with complaints of pain in her right hip. She underwent physical therapy for several weeks, but her symptoms did not improve. Her doctor then referred her to an orthopedic surgeon, who ordered an MRI. The surgeon sought pre-authorization for the MRI from the defendant, the plaintiff’s insurance provider. The defendant denied the request for pre-authorization after a doctor reviewing the plaintiff’s request, and health history determined that she failed to show that the MRI was medically necessary.

Reportedly, the defendant elaborated that the plaintiff had not demonstrated that she failed to improve following a six-week regimen of rest, physical therapy, and medication, despite that she had completed the course of physical therapy and pain medication recommended by her doctor. The doctor appealed, and after several weeks the MRI was approved. The plaintiff underwent an MRI, which revealed cancer in her right hip. Her leg was amputated, and her treating doctor advised if she presented a month earlier, her leg could have been saved. She then filed a lawsuit against the defendant asserting numerous claims, including medical malpractice. The defendant moved for dismissal. Continue reading

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While most medical malpractice cases arise out of the failure to provide patients with treatment that complies with the applicable standard, some allege that the defendant violated the duties owed to the plaintiff by failing to adequately explain the risks associated with a treatment prior to prescribing it to the plaintiff. As with other cases arising out of medical negligence, a plaintiff alleging harm due to lack of informed consent must set forth evidence in the form of an expert report that demonstrates that the defendant should be held accountable for the harm the plaintiff suffered. Plaintiffs that fail to meet this burden may have their claims dismissed, as demonstrated in a recent dermatology malpractice case in which a New York court dismissed the plaintiff’s claims due to insufficient evidence of the defendant’s liability. If you suffered harm due to a careless dermatologist, you should confer with a Syracuse medical malpractice lawyer to discuss your possible claims.

The Plaintiff’s Allegations

It is reported that the plaintiff sought treatment from the defendant for male pattern baldness. He was prescribed and used a topical ointment, after which he subsequently developed post-finasteride syndrome, which consists of numerous irreversible sexual, physical, neurological, and mental health issues. He then filed a lawsuit against the defendant, alleging that the defendant failed to obtain the plaintiff’s informed consent prior to prescribing the ointment. After discovery was completed, the defendant moved for summary judgment. The court granted the defendant’s motion, and the plaintiff appealed. On appeal, the trial court ruling was affirmed.

Expert Reports in Lack of Informed Consent Claims

In a case arising out of the alleged lack of informed consent, a defendant moving for summary judgment must establish, prima facie, that it did not depart from the accepted and good practice of medicine in prescribing a treatment. In the subject case, the appellate court noted that the defendant’s expert explained that the information the defendant provided to the plaintiff prior to prescribing the ointment regarding the potential side effects, including post-finasteride syndrome, went above and beyond the applicable standard of care. Continue reading

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In a New York medical malpractice case, there is a strong preference that matters be determined on their merits. This means, among other things, that such a case is rarely dismissed for failure to comply with discovery requests during the litigation process. Generally speaking, the courts prefer to use less drastic measures whenever possible.

Still, dismissal of an otherwise valid claim for failure to abide by procedural requirements is a possibility in some cases. Thus, it is important that a would-be medical negligence litigant seek the counsel of a qualified attorney who can assist with all aspects of the pre-trial, trial, and post-trial phases of the case.

The defendant’s insurance company will jump at any opportunity to have the plaintiff’s case dismissed, and an aggressive defense is to be expected. This typically includes an attempt to end the case prior to trial, either via a motion to dismiss or a motion for summary judgment.

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Syracuse Medical malpractice cases tend to involve multiple parties and a myriad of legal issues. Typically, all of the patient’s claims are tried in the same trial, complicated though it may be.

Occasionally, however, either the patient or the medical provider may ask that the issues be severed and that separate trials be had. It is unusual for a trial court to grant such a motion, as bifurcated trials are by far the exception rather than the rule.

Facts of the Case

The plaintiff in a New York County Supreme Court case was a former patient of the defendant medical doctor. After the plaintiff filed a lawsuit against the doctor setting forth a claim for medical malpractice, the doctor asserted a statute of limitations defense. According to the doctor’s view of the case, the plaintiff had not brought his claim within the limitations period allowed by law, and thus his claim should be dismissed as untimely.

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In a Syracuse medical malpractice case, the plaintiff has the burden of proving that the defendant medical provider breached the applicable standard of care. This standard must be determined on a case-by-case basis because not every doctor, nurse, or medical clinic owes a patient the same duty.

For instance, physicians in different specialties may have different duties to diagnose a particular disease in a patient. This means that a general practitioner or “family doctor” might not be expected to recognize a rare disease or illness in every situation.

It should also be noted that, even if it is determined that a particular medical provider did breach a duty of care, the inquiry does not stop there. Additionally, the plaintiff must also be able to show, by a preponderance of the evidence, that this breach of care was a proximate cause of the injuries for which the patient or his or her family seeks monetary compensation.

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